e:Med

has the objective of promoting system-oriented research of diseases by linking life sciences and informatics and establishing a systems medicine network in Germany.

e:Med

has the objective of promoting system-oriented research of diseases by linking life sciences and informatics and establishing a systems medicine network in Germany.

e:Med

has the objective of promoting system-oriented research of diseases by linking life sciences and informatics and establishing a systems medicine network in Germany.

e:Med

has the objective of promoting system-oriented research of diseases by linking life sciences and informatics and establishing a systems medicine network in Germany.

A systems medicine network

e:Med has the objective of establishing systems medicine in Germany. e:Med promotes system-oriented research into diseases in order to facilitate improved prevention, more comprehensive diagnostics and individually adjusted therapy schemes in individualized medicine. The program brings together scientists with molecular-genetic, clinical, mathematical and information technology expertise, with the objective of ensuring research results quickly benefit patients. Electronic processing (e:Med), i.e. computerized archiving, analysis and integration of data, plays a particularly important role here. The nationwide research and funding concept has been funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) since mid-2014.

Highlights

Consortia

Mutations take their toll on the bones

Genetic factors are responsible for bone loss with mutliple myeolma: Bone loss is very common with multiple myeloma. Since therapy must be selected according to bone loss occurrence, predicting the course of the disease is important. Why some patients are affected whereas others are not was subject to a systems medicine analysis. Highlight from the e:Med Newsletter

Demonstrators

Cellular rush hour

How can cellular dynamics be defined at multiple levels and in temporal resolution? In order to map these complex processes, both the handling of large data sets as well as elaborated software solutions are required. An application for analyzing large amounts of omics data in terms of time is shown here. Highlight from the e:Medium

Consortia

Differences of myocardial infarction in men and women are not attributed to X chromosome

An international consortium discovered that the differences between women and men in myocardial infarction are not attributed to the X chromosome. This was the first study ever to search for triggers of complex diseases on the X chromosome.
The study that included more than 100,000 people was conducted by Prof. Jeanette Erdmann and Prof. Inke R. König, University of Lübeck, within the scope of the e:AtheroSysMed consortium. More than 80 scientists from 14 different countries were involved. read more

Consortia

High concentration of Oncogene MYC activates additional genes

In most tumors a high concentration of the transcription factor MYC is prevalent. e:Med scientists of the SYSMED-NB consortia now have discovered that high MYC-levels activate additional genes which encourage tumor formation. In low concentrations this important factor only binds to high affinity genes which are responsible for controlled cell proliferation. But when excessive amounts of MYC are produced in a cell, genes with a low affinity also get activated which leads to tumor formation. Scientists of the University of Würzburg investigated concentration-dependent expression patterns in cells and confirmed their studies using modeling approaches. Hence, the expression pattern depends on cellular MYC concentration. Partial inhibition of MYC might serve as a new target for therapy. read more

Demonstrators

International collection of open reading frames now totals 80 percent of human protein-coding genes

An international collaboration of organizations, has reached a milestone in creating a library of complete genetic blueprints for the thousands of different proteins in human cells. The collection – consisting of open-reading frames (ORFs), the portions of genes that code for full-length proteins – is an essential resource for scientists studying the basic mechanics of human cells and how those processes go awry in disease. read more

Consortia

Dopamine fluctuations in alcohol addiction

In a new study, e:Med researchers at the CIMH found elevated concentrations of the neurotransmitter dopamine in brain regions of alcoholics who had been abstinent for a longer period of time. During acute withdrawal the amount of dopamine is markedly decreased. Based on the findings, new behavioral experiments can now be designed to better understand the connection between elevated dopamine and a relapse into alcohol dependence. read more

Consortia

New Computational Approach Reveals Hidden Cell Subpopulations

e:Med scientists from Helmholtz Zentrum München and colleagues from Technische Universität München and the European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) have developed a computational approach which facilitates the identification of confounding factors and hidden biological processes in the analysis of single-cell RNA sequence data, enabling a more accurate picture of the different cell types. Thus, cell types can be identified that otherwise would remain undetected. read more

Consortia

Genetic causes of mental illness discovered

Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder are among the most common forms of mental illness in Europe. e:Med researchers from various institutions, in conjunction with international colleagues, have managed to identify new genetic areas related to these disorders. Scientists expect these results to provide starting points for the investigation of causes and the development of new therapies. read more