e:Med

has the objective of promoting system-oriented research of diseases by linking life sciences and informatics and establishing a systems medicine network in Germany.

e:Med

has the objective of promoting system-oriented research of diseases by linking life sciences and informatics and establishing a systems medicine network in Germany.

e:Med

has the objective of promoting system-oriented research of diseases by linking life sciences and informatics and establishing a systems medicine network in Germany.

e:Med

has the objective of promoting system-oriented research of diseases by linking life sciences and informatics and establishing a systems medicine network in Germany.

A systems medicine network

e:Med has the objective of establishing systems medicine in Germany. e:Med promotes system-oriented research into diseases in order to facilitate improved prevention, more comprehensive diagnostics and individually adjusted therapy schemes in individualized medicine. The program brings together scientists with molecular-genetic, clinical, mathematical and information technology expertise, with the objective of ensuring that research results quickly benefit patients.
Electronic processing (e:Med) plays a particularly important role for unraveling scientific questions in iterative cycles of experimental studies and computer modelling approaches. The nationwide research and funding concept has been funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) since 2014.

Highlights

e:Med

Personalized Medicine Day

The "Personalized Medicine Day" in Berlin was a great success! 400 pupils, students, scientists and interested citizens have come to the Urania and have obtained information through lectures and interactive experiments on the current research of personalized medicine.

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Demonstrators

With diabetes medication against Parkinson’s disease

For some patients, suffering from a specific type of Parkinson, a diabetic medication could help to stop disease progression. This new approach is investigated by Julia Fitzgerald and colleagues from the Hertie-Instiute in Tuebingen.

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Consortia

Detecting early warning signs and disease transition in alcohol addiction

e:Med researchers from the SysMedAlcoholism consortium and their cooperation partners at the University of Tokyo found out for the first time by means of a new computational approach that the transition into an addictive drinking behavior are preceded by predictive "early warning signals". The analytical approach to elaborate longitudinal data has the potential to predict the onset of illness and changes in various stages of the disease in the state of health.

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Consortia

Schizophrenia risk mutations lead to instable neuronal networks

How does Schizophrenia work on the molecular level? In this study, dynamic network neuroscience techniques and neuroimaging methods were applied by scientists of the e:Med consortia IntegraMent to uncover the molecular and genetic contributions of glutamate and brain network dynamics.

Highlight from the e:MedIUM

Consortia

Beta cells under fire

Type 2 diabetes causes pathological changes in the beta cells. Scientists have successfully depicted the processes on the basis of the metabolome and proteome for the first time. Their work has been published in Cell Metabolism.

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Junior research alliances and consortia

The importance of being genotyped

Small cell lung cancer is an aggressive type of cancer and can progress in very different, individual ways but so far no targeted therapy has been approved. By designing a mouse model mimicking a human disease phenotype, scientists of the e:Med alliances MILES & SMOOSE discovered a promising combination therapy.

Highlight from the e:Medium

Junior research alliances

New route to a diagnosis

In about half of all patients with rare hereditary disorders, it is still unclear what exact position of the genome is responsible for their condition - despite whole genome sequencing analysis. One reason for this is the enormous quantity of information encoded in human genes. Scientists from the fields of informatics and medicine have now joined forces to find a solution: A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Helmholtz Zentrum München has developed a method that significantly increases the chances of a successful search. The new approach looks not only at DNA, but also at RNA. The e:Med junior research alliance mitOmics contributed substantially to this study.

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  •                                                      ...all highlights