e:Med

has the objective of promoting system-oriented research of diseases by linking life sciences and informatics and establishing a systems medicine network in Germany.

e:Med

has the objective of promoting system-oriented research of diseases by linking life sciences and informatics and establishing a systems medicine network in Germany.

e:Med

has the objective of promoting system-oriented research of diseases by linking life sciences and informatics and establishing a systems medicine network in Germany.

e:Med

has the objective of promoting system-oriented research of diseases by linking life sciences and informatics and establishing a systems medicine network in Germany.

A systems medicine network

e:Med has the objective of establishing systems medicine in Germany. e:Med promotes system-oriented research into diseases in order to facilitate improved prevention, more comprehensive diagnostics and individually adjusted therapy schemes in individualized medicine. The program brings together scientists with molecular-genetic, clinical, mathematical and information technology expertise, with the objective of ensuring research results quickly benefit patients. Electronic processing (e:Med), i.e. computerized archiving, analysis and integration of data, plays a particularly important role here. The nationwide research and funding concept has been funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) since mid-2014.

e:MedIUM - Newsletter of the e:Med Community

e:Medium 2 Newsletter

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Highlights

Demonstrators and Junior research alliances

Metabolic fine tuning

Amino acids as signaling molecules: Interaction uncovered
Amino acids are important signaling molecules which influence cellular and organismal metabolism, however, their molecular targets are not yet completely identified.
A systems study has now shed light into the molecular interaction network and the diverse cellular functions of amino acids. Highlight from the e:Med Newsletter

Consortia

Tracking down allergies

Decoding T cell regulation in allergies: What works differently in the immune system of allergic persons? Which immune cells can be held responsible for immune system overreaction? Scientists from Berlin, together with the e:Med consortia e:Kid around Professor Nina Babel, have now shed light on these questions and have decoded the role of the different T cells in allergies. Highlight from the e:Med Newsletter

Consortia

Calculating Cancer

Mathematical models to predict and fight cancer: How can mathematical models be used in order to improve cancer prognosis and therapy? In the studies presented here, e:Med scientists from SYSIMIT generated models to improve prediction of breast cancer development and for a personalized treatment of bacterial infection against cancer. Highlight from the e:Med Newsletter

Junior Research Alliance

Mapping regulatory DNA regions

Tools for improved analysis of gene regulation: Regulatory DNA regions are important elements for gene activity control. However, these areas are very difficult to identify since the RNA produced is rapidly degraded. e:Med scientist Julien Gagneur from the junior research alliance mitOmics and colleagues published an innovative sequencing method in Science, which makes it possible to collect and map all RNA segments transcribed within 5 minutes. In addition, they created software for improved annotation of regulatory elements, which they applied to 127 human cell types and tissues.The two tools enable detailed mapping of the human transient transcriptome and of active regulatory elements providing us with important information about gene regulation and thus insight into the molecular origin of diseases. read more

Consortia

Finding common ground for various diseases

Cross-disease analysis shows genetic reasons for the common appearance of inflammatory diseases:  Why are some patients affected by several inflammatory diseases, for instance, intestinal and liver diseases, at the same time? e:Med scientists are seeking to understand the cause why inflammatory diseases appear together. Highlight from the e:Med Newsletter

Consortia

Mutations take their toll on the bones

Genetic factors are responsible for bone loss with mutliple myeolma: Bone loss is very common with multiple myeloma. Since therapy must be selected according to bone loss occurrence, predicting the course of the disease is important. Why some patients are affected whereas others are not was subject to a systems medicine analysis. Highlight from the e:Med Newsletter

Demonstrators

Cellular rush hour

How can cellular dynamics be defined at multiple levels and in temporal resolution? In order to map these complex processes, both the handling of large data sets as well as elaborated software solutions are required. An application for analyzing large amounts of omics data in terms of time is shown here. Highlight from the e:Medium

Consortia

Differences of myocardial infarction in men and women are not attributed to X chromosome

An international consortium discovered that the differences between women and men in myocardial infarction are not attributed to the X chromosome. This was the first study ever to search for triggers of complex diseases on the X chromosome.
The study that included more than 100,000 people was conducted by Prof. Jeanette Erdmann and Prof. Inke R. König, University of Lübeck, within the scope of the e:AtheroSysMed consortium. More than 80 scientists from 14 different countries were involved. read more