e:Med

has the objective of promoting system-oriented research of diseases by linking life sciences and informatics and establishing a systems medicine network in Germany.

e:Med

has the objective of promoting system-oriented research of diseases by linking life sciences and informatics and establishing a systems medicine network in Germany.

e:Med

has the objective of promoting system-oriented research of diseases by linking life sciences and informatics and establishing a systems medicine network in Germany.

e:Med

has the objective of promoting system-oriented research of diseases by linking life sciences and informatics and establishing a systems medicine network in Germany.

A systems medicine network

e:Med has the objective of establishing systems medicine in Germany. e:Med promotes system-oriented research into diseases in order to facilitate improved prevention, more comprehensive diagnostics and individually adjusted therapy schemes in individualized medicine. The program brings together scientists with molecular-genetic, clinical, mathematical and information technology expertise, with the objective of ensuring that research results quickly benefit patients.
Electronic processing (e:Med) plays a particularly important role for unraveling scientific questions in iterative cycles of experimental studies and computer modelling approaches. The nationwide research and funding concept has been funded by the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) since 2014.

Events and Highlights

Project groups

Omics Symposium

The online Omics Symposium Metabolomics, Lipidomics, and Proteomics 2023 will take place March 13, 2023 from 12 – 5:30 pm via Zoom. Everyone who is interested in the MS- and NMR-Based OMICS fields is welcome to join this symposium. All participants, especially PhD students/postdocs/leaders of junior research groups, who are interested in presenting their research are invited to submit an abstract for a short talk (10 minutes). The program includes keynote talks from academia and industry as well as short talks from the community.

More information and registration

Project groups

Online Seminar: Modeling approaches for disease processes

The e:Med project group Modeling of Disease Processes organizes an Online Seminar Series (Zoom) “Modelling approaches for disease processes”. This seminar series aims to introduce, discuss and compare different mathematical modeling approaches in the field of disease modeling and is open to PhD and master students, postdocs and group leaders in the modeling field
Upcoming Seminar: Sara Checa, Julius Wolff Institute, Berlin Institute of Health (BIH), Charité, Computer models of tissue regeneration through agent-based modeling approaches.

March 1, 2023 at 2 pm (CET)

Project group website

e:Med

e:MedIUM Newsletter #6

The latest e:MedIUM Newsletter #6 is out! Read here about bioinformatics tools for drug repurposing, simulating vaccinations, regulatory mechanisms of neurons, and improvements in leukemia diagnostics.
Stay curious and enjoy reading!

read newsletter

e:Med

Merry Christmas

We wish you and your families a relaxing Christmas and a good start into a peaceful and successful new year 2023. At the end of November, after years of exclusively digital events, the e:Med community finally gathered for an in-person meeting. Thanks to you, the e:Med Meeting 2022 was also a real success, with lots of networking and science. We are already looking forward to seeing as many of you as possible in person again in Berlin in October 2023. Thank you very much for your trust! We are very pleased to accompany all of this as e:Med office. 

e:Med

e:Med Meeting 2022 on Systems Medicine November 28-30, 2022 Heidelberg, DKFZ

The e:Med Meeting 2022 took place November 28-30, 2022 at DKFZ Communication Center in Heidelberg. Over 230 scientists joint the on-site meeting to discuss your latest research results with fellow scientist from the systems medicine community. We thank all participants, speakers, presenters and helpers for this inspiring meeting. See you next year in Berlin!

Meeting Website

Junior research alliances

scOpen untangles kidney fibrosis

scATAC-seq allows the examination of accessible DNA regions in single cells. However, the nature of the experimental protocol makes it difficult to reliably analyze and interpret the data. Researchers from the e:Med junior research alliance Fibromap have developed the scOpen tool to analyze these single-cell data in more detail. Their tool leads to a better understanding of renal fibrosis and uncovered a previously unknown role of the Runx1 gene in the progression of this disease.

Highlight from the e:MedIUM

Junior research alliances

Novel protective mechanism for blood stem cells

Blood stem cells from the bone marrow produce blood and immune cells. Errors that occur in the genome during division are inherited by the daughter stem cells and can ultimately lead to blood cancer. Using gene expression analysis and single-cell technologies, the team of the e:Med junior research alliance LeukoSyStem has discovered a protective mechanism that renders degenerate stem cells harmless. The results were published in Cell Stem Cell.

read more

Junior research alliances

Telltales of depression in our blood

Depression is a major cause of disability worldwide. Due to its complex nature, it is difficult to explain the molecular pathways associated with depression by examining the genetic factors. e:Med junior research alliance CKDNapp chose a metabolomics approach to tackle this problem. The results of their population-wide screen for metabolites revealed laurylcarnitine to be associated with depression. This metabolite is involved in the fatty acid oxidation pathway and may provide new therapy options against depression.

Highlight from the e:MedIUM Newsletter

Demonstrators

Hungry for glutamine – Understanding the metabolism of breast cancer

What to do when a cancer subtype can’t be targeted with drugs or hormones? Researchers of e:Med Her2low alliance focused their attention on understanding the metabolic needs of cancer cells. Their study revealed that cancer cells operate with altered metabolic and nutrient-sensing pathways to sustain tumorigenesis and these alterations might be targeted as a therapy approach

read more

  •                                                      ...all highlights

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